Carl Frampton vs Nonito Donaire Scorecard by Gold


scorecard by GOLD
Round
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Total
CARL FRAMPTON
9
10
10
10
9
10
10
10
10
10
9
10
117
NONITO DONAIRE
10
9
9
9
10
9
9
9
9
9
10
9
111

Fight:



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Carl Frampton

Nonito Donaire



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Comments

Champion97's picture

I think this should be an excellent fight! This will certainly be very entertaining for casual and hardcore fans alike as both guys have very flashy, eye catching styles. I think this was the best realistic fight that could be made for both Vasyl Lomachenko and Jorge Linares. I am very confident that Lomachenko will win this fight, I believe it is around a 90/10 fight for Lomachenko. Despite me thinking it is such a slim chance for Linares to win, I think that it will be a very competitive fight. However, I believe Lomachenko has most of the advantages in this fight and he will be able to exploit the weaknesses of Linares.

I believe there may be some outside factors in this fight. The fight is in New York City, New York in the big room at Madison Square Garden. Lomachenko is likely the most well known and liked boxer by casual fans in the United States outside of Canelo. I believe Lomachenko will have the crowd behind him. I don’t think there are really any judging concerns, Golden Boy has had some very questionable cards in the past but Lomachenko is the A-side with Top Rank’s backing.

For Linares, this is certainly the biggest fight of his career, however, he is a very experienced professional with forty seven bouts and four championships in three weight classes. He is a 5’8 orthodox boxer with a 69 inch reach and is 32 years old. He had a decent amateur career, almost 100 fights, but he fought at the domestic Venezuelan amateur level. He turned professional at just 18 years old at Featherweight in Japan. He got his first title opportunity for the vacant WBC Featherweight title versus Oscar Larios, a decorated and long reigning former Super Bantamweight and future Featherweight champion. Linares dominated Larios with his versatile and sophisticated offense to stop Larios.
After defending his title once, he moved up and won the vacant WBA Super Featherweight title which he defended once. He lost his Super Featherweight title in his second defense to a young Juan Salgado who overwhelmed him with pressure and stopped Linares in the first round. Linares moved up again and got a title opportunity versus Antonio DeMarco for the vacant WBC Lightweight title. The once defeated DeMarco was outboxed by Linares for the vast majority of the fight and was on the way to losing the fight. Despite this, DeMarco kept pressuring Linares, cut Linares up stopped Linares. Linares was meant to rebound with a tune-up versus Sergio Thompson, but Thompson exploited Linares’ inability to deal with pressure, cutting and stopping Linares in the second round.
At this point, many thought Linares’ career was over, but through his work with Cuban trainer Ismael Salas he has rebuilt his career. He won the vacant WBC Lightweight title versus Francisco Prieto, defended it in a grueling tenth round technical knockout victory over Kevin Mitchell who dropped Linares but was ultimately overwhelmed by Linares’ offense. After an easy defense versus Ivan Cano, Linares was stripped of his title, but rebounded with a fight versus WBA Lightweight champion Anthony Crolla. Linares outboxed Crolla to win a close but clear decision to take the WBA Lightweight title and the vacant Ring Magazine title. Linares rematched Crolla and beat him easily in a showcase of his boxing skills, dropping Crolla and winning a wide decision.
Linares then defended his title against Olympic gold medal champion Luke Campbell. Linares came out hot and dropped Campbell with a beautiful combination in the second round and looked to be on the road to winning widely. Yet, Campbell, a long rangey southpaw, boxed his way back into the fight as Linares was not able to put together his offense for long amounts of time. Linares escaped with a close but seemingly clear split decision. After this, he made the third defense of his WBA and Ring Magazine titles in a tune-up wide decision victory over Mercito Gesta.

For Lomachenko, my third best pound for pound fighter, this is arguably the biggest fight of his career. Yet, he has been in plenty of big fights in his short career as a professional. In eleven bouts he has fought in ten world title fights and is a two weight champion. He is a 5’7 southpaw boxer with a 65 ½ inch reach and is 30 years old. Lomachenko had a very long and storied amateur career, arguably one of the greatest of all times. He went 396-1, avenged his one loss and most notably won the 2007 World Championships and Olympic gold in 2008 at Featherweight and the 2009 World Championships, 2011 World Championships, and Olympic gold in 2012 as a Lightweight. He then fought and won six World Series of Boxing fights, which are essentially professional fights but do not count towards Lomachenko’s professional record.
After an easy victory in his “first” professional bout versus Jose Ramirez, Lomachenko was given a title shot versus the veteran four time two weight champion Orlando Siri Salido for Salido’s WBO Featherweight title. If he had won this “second” pro bout, he would have set the record for fewest fights to win a title. Taking this fight proved to be a miscalculation by Lomachenko’s management and promoter and is likely one of the most controversial recent high profile fights. Salido was stripped of his title on the scales making the title vacant and only on the line for Lomachenko. Salido boxed masterfully in the first portion of the fight, pressuring, working the body, showing very advanced inside boxing skills and overwhelming Lomachenko who was not throwing enough. Lomachenko began to win some rounds and make the fight closer, and Salido used some veteran “tactics” in the second half of the fight with a few low blows to try to persevere. Lomachenko didn’t step on the gas until the 11th round and he nearly got Salido out of there but Salido held on to win a deserved split decision.
After this early set back, he rebounded versus Gary Russell Jr. for the vacant WBO Featherweight title. Russell showed his great hand speed at times but Lomachenko neutralized and outboxed him to win a majority decision that should have been a wide unanimous decision. He then defended his title three times versus mediocre opposition before moving up to Super Featherweight to challenge Roman Martinez for Martinez’s WBO Super Featherweight title. Lomachenko beat Martinez in impressive fashion, stopping him in the fifth round. He then fought in an anticipated matchup versus former WBA Featherweight champion Nicholas Walters. Walters was seen as a top fighter previously by beating old versions of Vic Darchinyan and Nonito Donaire, but his motivation was seriously questionable, and he lost his title on the scales versus Miguel Marriaga. Lomachenko put a beating on Walters and Walters corner called a stop to the fight after seven rounds.
Following this, Lomachenko fought two more overmatched opponents in Jason Sosa and Miguel Marriaga, who Lomachenko forced corner stoppages from. In his latest fight and the fourth defense of his WBO Super Featherweight title, Lomachenko fought fellow two time Olympic gold medal champion and pound for pound fighter Guillermo Rigondeaux. This was a highly anticipated battle, but Rigondeaux was just too aged and too small to present a challenge to Lomachenko who won via sixth round corner stoppage. Overall, Lomachenko is an extremely well rounded fighter. He has sophisticated and high level movement, offense, and defense outside of his loss to Orlando Salido. The one possibly questionable area is if he will have enough power to get respect at Lightweight.
Lomachenko is unquestionably a pound for pound level fighter due to his skill and consistency. However, there is a question of how good his opposition actually has been considering he has not unified titles and some believe him to be the best boxer pound for pound in the world.

I am very confident in Lomachenko’s ability to win this fight. I think despite him having to come up in weight and not being a big guy for Lightweight, he will be able to overcome those obstacles. Theoretically both of these guys are in or around their primes, perhaps Linares is slightly on the downside of his. Both of these guys have shown weaknesses in their defeats and although they have both improved those weaknesses may still exist in a lesser form. For Linares to win, he will have to use his natural size advantages and he will have to keep his offense going throughout the rounds, especially his combination punching. Linares is a good puncher but not a devastating one and he will want to pressure and invest to the body like Salido did to try to slow down Lomachenko’s movement, one of his best weapons. Linares has a nice jab and body jab and he has a significant height and reach advantage, so he must put this to use. His defense must be tighter than it has been before, he has had defensive lapses and Campbell, a slick southpaw, was able to land with relative frequency on him. He also must use his experience to push Lomachenko, even if he is not winning rounds he can make Lomachenko think and have to expend more energy than he usually does which can help him in later rounds. For Lomachenko to win, he needs to do the things he usually does, use his movement, overwhelm his opponents with sophisticated combination punching. He must avoid getting bogged down, being outpunched and outpointed by the larger Linares. Linares is a good enough technician that he will certainly land on Lomachenko, he is no Jason Sosa, and when Linares does land Lomachenko must stick to his guns. I don’t think Lomachenko has the power to stop Linares, but I believe he will outbox him to win a clear decision.

If Lomachenko wins, people will certainly be saying he is the best pound for pound fighter in the world. Winning would set him up to make a decision on which title he will vacate. I am almost certain he will vacate the WBO Super Featherweight title, he has fought there for some time and it is time to move to bigger and better things. At Lightweight, I don’t really know if there are a lot of interesting and realistic matchups in near future for Lomachenko. I believe next he would fight Ray Beltran to unify the WBA and WBO titles, but that would be easy work for Lomachenko. Outside of that, Luke Campbell, who signed with Top Rank, would be a good option. Potentially Anthony Crolla could be possible, but Crolla is past his prime and is overmatched. I don’t think he will be able to fight Robert Easter Jr, I think Mikey Garcia will fight him given they are both PBC fighters. Mikey Garcia is an absolute no go at this stage even though that is the matchup everyone wants to see. The fight just does not have big enough of a profile to make it happen at this point. If he loses, I believe he will be given a rematch against Linares as it is the biggest money option out there for Linares.

If Linares wins, he certainly should be rated as a top ten pound for pound fighter. This would set him up for other big fights in the division, such as a fight with Mikey Garcia, but promotional issues may prevent that. If Linares actually beats Lomachenko, I believe they will rematch because of the money involved in it for Linares. If he loses, I think Linares may have to rebuild himself again, given the promotional situations at Lightweight he does not have the draw to get an immediate title shot.

Champion97's picture

Here is your analysis, with the bad bits cut out,
I don't like your negativity, and to be honest, your arrogance, stubbornness, and ridiculousness is something I've had enough of.

Gold's picture

Does Lomachenko join the ranks of the uncriticizable Jeff Horn and Tony Bellew? Talking about his resume and if it is good or not is perfectly reasonable given the status that is attributed to him as a top pound for pound fighter. Perhaps my analysis should be "Linares is good but Lomachenko is gooder! best of luck to both though!"

Champion97's picture

One of us needs to grow up, because you have taken hours out of my life with your nonsense, it is so ridiculous that me correcting you turned into a roundabout argument because you are that much of a stubborn nitpicker!

You can criticise whoever you want, you can predict Haye to beat Bellew, you can predict Horn to get stopped early against Crawford, you are entitled to your own opinion on Lomachenko as well of course, but that isn't what you have done, I am going to delete another reply on the weight topic and not even send it to you, because I have absolutely had enough of this bullshit man, you are the absolute limit!, and you are doing my head in with your BS, you know you are wrong about the weight topic, you know Povetkin vs Price wasn't 100/0, but you won't admit it, I've absolutely had enough!

Gold's picture

I am done talking about weights, you are wrong but you won't ever get it. I would much rather talk about Lomachenko's opposition.

Champion97's picture

You were wrong about the weight! And you know it! Will Terence Crawford be at a weight disadvantage against Jeff Horn? The answer is yes.

A few months ago, you thanked me for all I do for this site, I considered you a good addition to this site, I don't like beef. You give me facts, I give you facts, and opinions are opinions, ok, why not?

Gold's picture

Ok, so I will add my resume section back?

Champion97's picture

Yes, I was wrong to delete it.

Champion97's picture

Nicholas Walters and Guillermo Rigondeaux both beat Nonito Donaire, fact.
Jason Sosa beat Stephen Smith and Javier Fortuna, fact. How good are Smitn and Fortuna?, that is a matter of opinion, to a degree.
Roman Martinez dropped Mikey Garcia, beat Orlando Salido, fact.
Roman Martinez was a 4 time world champion, fact.
Miguel Marriaga gave Oscar Valdez real problems, fact.
Guillermo Rigondeaux had an outstanding amateur record and stood out for his incredible defensive ability, fact.

Lomachenko probably won every round against all these fighters, that knockout against Martinez, that was one of the best KOs I've ever seen, that was some statement! That is nkt fact, it is my opinion, but it is a very valid and widely shared.

Lomachenko vs Rigondeaux, at 126, had Rigondeaux been 5 years younger, for me, would have been a 50/50 fight, we both know how much age and weight matter in boxing, and it is not the victory it would have been had it not been for those circumstances, but we knew Rigondeaux was old and small before the fight, I don't know about you, but even under those circumstances, I did not expect Lomachenko to dismantle Rigondeaux and make him quit like that, over 6 one sided rounds, that was outstandingly dominant, and that is the thing about Lomachenko, it seems seriously easy for him. I beating Rigondeaux, even with the weight and age, is a great achievement, it isn't the outstanding victory it would have been without the disadvantages, but also, how hard is it to fight these top guys and get these great, career defining wins?, you could just as easily criticise Golovkin's resume, you could even criticise Crawford's resume if you try to be negative.

There is being a constructive critic, like you, but you can also have unrealistic expectations, not saying you necessarily do, but it is hard for the best to fight the best at the right time, it is hard for two guys to even get recognition as the best.

Liston wasn't at his best when Clay beat him.
De La Hoya wasn't at his best when Mayweather beat him.
Gatti wasn't at his best when Mayweather beat him.
Tyson wasn't at his best when Lewis beat him.
If Charlo beat Golovkin next year, then the same would apply.

I think you should find a balance between positive and negative, and form your opinion, being maybe critical, but realistic.

You have Lomachenko ranked 3, you are not saying he is overrated, but his resume is, right?

Gold's picture

Donaire was a top five pound for pound fighter when Rigondeaux beat him, after that his motivation went downhill and he became a more one dimensional fighter that relied on his power.
Sosa beat Fortuna who is a good name on paper but he was fighting with a very strange style for a power puncher like himself. He is someone who has overachieved, he should not have won a world championship.
Martinez is only a three time world champion, he won the title versus Nicky Cook, lost it versus Burns, won it versus Beltran, lost it versus Garcia, won it versus Salido and lost it versus Lomachenko. Martinez beat a shot version of Salido. He still was beat relatively easily by Garcia and KO'd.
Marriaga still lost a wide UD versus Valdez. He is not a world level fighter.
Rigondeaux was an excellent Super Bantamweight, but he was very aged and out of his weight range to be able to beat someone of Lomachenko's ability.

Lomachenko beat all of them widely, but all of them are overrated as opponents. Martinez is just not a statement win, he is just someone you have to beat to be considered a world champion.

I thought the weight and age would be a bridge too far for Rigondeaux. People were looking at what he did versus Donaire to see what he could do versus Lomachenko, that was many years ago versus an opponent in a different weight class. The thing is that Top Rank should have been trying to make unification fights at Featherweight and Super Featherweight, but they haven't really done that. They have chased questionable opponents and opponents in other weight classes. Lomachenko is the biggest ticket at Featherweight and Super Featherweight so it shouldn't be impossible to unify titles. Guys like Golovkin especially and Crawford to an extent aren't the draws Lomachenko is so it is harder to criticize them for not getting fights versus big opponents. All three of them scare promoters off by beating opponents badly save for Golovkin when he started to get the big fights.

I understand it is a difficult balance to look at resumes, it is possible to make anyone's resume look bad, but I believe in this case it is actually true that his resume is overrated outside of Russell and Salido. Making unification fights is the biggest thing I think they have missed that could have built his resume better than it is currently.

I get your point with these examples but outside of De La Hoya for Mayweather and Golovkin for Charlo (whose career is not over yet), the other three are not in the argument for being the best names on their resumes. Sometimes boxers have to fight over the hill fighters, that doesn't take away from their resume, but it shouldn't add to it much either.

I think he is #3 worthy based on a combination of eye test and resume. To me, pound for pound is essentially a combination of those two major factors. I think he is overrated for those who say he is #1 at the moment because he hasn't proven it versus the highest level of opponents.

Champion97's picture

I would enjoy talking boxing with you like a adult, but you are so stubborn and arrogant, you are impossible to have a reasonable discussion with. Lomachenko's opposite has been great in my opinion, I have my own argument to tackle yours, but because you never accept anything, can't take being wrong or exposed for exaggerating, what is the point in discussing it with you? I play my part, but I weakness I have is wasting my time talking to people like who are arrogant and acting like morons. You have good grammar, you are analytical, but I think the way look at the sport and are so bound up and stubborn in what you believe is bad, you should learn to accept when you are wrong, give people a chance, consider opposing arguments. Also exaggerations are one thing, but don't declare fighters as unclean when there is no proof, and you aren't qualified to investigate, because that is not right.

Gold's picture

My argument is based in fact, not opinion or exaggeration. It is reasonable to discuss resumes when discussing a fight.